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How to understand the male ego

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The term "male ego" itself is the subject of much discussion, as it does not have a clear definition. In order to understand how the male ego affects the behavior and thoughts of the stronger sex, one should pay attention to the ways of its social formation. In other words, much that we consider the male ego is based on well-established assumptions and stereotypes about masculinity, most of which are unconsciously accepted by men as a given.

Three whales of cool men

The idea of ​​men about themselves is based on three norms: status (“I must be the coolest of all), firmness (“ I must be more right than everyone ”) and anti-womanhood (“ I must be the most manly of all ”). All of them are tied to the desire to prove the strength of their gender. If these norms are violated, the partner feels not courageous enough. And he thinks that he is being humiliated.

Do not dare to object to me!

When a wife expresses her disagreement with her husband (especially if she is also right!), He feels “not a man” (and if “not a man”, then there is no need to live) and seeks to restore his status. That is why, on a trip to an unfamiliar area, the partner, having ceased to navigate in space, aggressively protests against the woman’s offer to ask for directions (Well, screwed up? Does any passerby understand the route better than me?!) - The norms of status and hardness are violated - hence the hysteria. And if the husband manages to somehow prove to his wife that she is wrong, then he will again regain the feeling of masculinity.

Yes my Lord!

So now, is a woman always silent? On the one hand, it’s good not to break the husband’s norms. He will feel like a king, open his tail and become very pleased. Therefore, many men want submissions from wives. But which woman will always be silent? The way out is in the clarification. Dear ladies, remembering men's norms, tell your husband that if someone (especially close and dear!) Indicates errors, this is by no means an attempt to humiliate. On the contrary, you are not indifferent to the partner and want to see him always right. Well, if you can’t explain it, tune in to understanding the masculine “jumps”, none of us are perfect!

Content

The ego is, along with the Eid (It) and Super Ego (Super self), one of the three psychological entities proposed by Sigmund Freud to describe the dynamics of the human psyche. The Ego, according to Freud, performs executive functions, being a mediator between the external and internal world, as well as between the Eid and the Super-Ego. It provides continuity, but a sequence of behavior, realizing a personal reference point, due to which the events of the past (stored in memory) are correlated with the events of the present and future (represented by foresight and imagination). The ego does not coincide with either the psyche or the body, although bodily sensations form the core of an individual's early experience. Having reached development, the ego is able to change throughout life, especially under the influence of a threat, illness, and changes in living conditions.

As any individual develops, the differentiation of the Ego and the development of the Super-Ego occur. The super-ego includes prohibitions and control of instinctual impulses through the adoption of parental and social standards. And thus, there is a moral conflict necessary for the growth and maturation of the individual. The ego plays the role of a mediator between the Super-Ego and the Id by unconsciously creating protective mechanisms: denial, substitution, projection, rationalization, reactive formation, regression, suppression, sublimation, etc. When one of the protective mechanisms is realized, it gives way to others. It is believed that as you use it, the power of the ego decreases.

Progress from an immediate reaction to controlled behavior, from prelogical to rational thinking, is slow and takes place in the form of many successive stages throughout childhood. Even after reaching physical maturity, people differ significantly in the forms and effectiveness of the ego. This important quality was called by Freud "the power of the ego." A person with a “strong ego” has the following characteristics: he is objective in his assessments of the world and himself, his activities have been organized for a longer time, so that planning and routines are possible, he is able to fulfill the decisions made and, without hesitation, choose from the available alternatives , he does not blindly submit to his aspirations and can direct them into a socially useful channel, he is able to withstand direct pressure from the physical and social environment, thinking and choosing his own Twain course. On the other hand, an individual with a “weak Ego” is more similar to a child: his behavior is impulsive and determined by the moment, his perception of reality and himself is distorted, he is less successful in productive work, since his energy is spent on defending distorted and unrealistic ideas about himself, he may suffer from neurotic symptoms.

In the analytical psychology of C. Jung, the ego is understood as a complex that includes all the contents of consciousness, which is included in the structure of the psyche along with the unconscious, consisting of the personal and collective unconscious. “This is a complex of data, constructed primarily by general awareness of one’s body, one’s existence and then memory data, a person has a certain idea about his past being, certain sets (series) of memory. These two components are the main constituents of EGO. Therefore, it is possible to call EGO a complex of mental factors. This complex has tremendous energy of attraction, like a magnet, it attracts content from the unconscious, from this dark unknown area, it also attracts impressions from the outside, and when they enter into a connection with the EGO, they are aware. ”

After Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, other scholars also revealed the concept of ego. The ego is regarded as “the source of behavior and the connecting center of the personality in its human environment” (Metzger, Psychologie, 1941). The ego in the process of human development stands out from a single primordial consciousness, which embraces the "external world" and one's own personality in inseparable unity. It is constantly accompanied by a consciousness of “with-itself-self-identical-being”, so if a person clearly understands his bodily and spiritual-spiritual changes, then he knows that, despite them, he is “fundamentally” (that is, in the depths of his Ego) always remains the same. The visual sphere of the Ego includes the body and everything that can serve to expand this sphere (which is the subject of constant aspiration): clothing, jewelry, and also property into which the Ego can “grow”. Often creative unity is seen in the Ego, reality acquires meaning only when correlated with it, this is most clearly expressed in Fichte: "The Ego requires that it embrace all reality and reach infinity." Nietzsche, on the contrary, says in relation to the Ego: "The ego is a multitude of personal (personenarten) forces, of which one or the other comes to the fore."

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