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Cantonese Chinese

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Fiddling with tones and accidentally stumbled upon the Cantonese. I already heard somewhere that everything is complicated there, but for the first time after listening to them, I realized that we were very lucky with putonghua, everything is quite easy.


I was glad that I almost always distinguish tones (* if perfectly pronounced). And then I accidentally listened to it, in my head I rang “what. I” in all tones.

I listened to Vietnamese, everything is cool there, but much simpler than Cantonese. Like Chinese + 2 new (broken ftw tone, want)


Very beautiful, it seems after the Chinese began to appreciate the tones. From far away, in my speech everything is bad.

2018.11.05 bkrs Listened to Vietnamese, everything is cool there, but much simpler than Cantonese. Like Chinese + 2 new (broken ftw tone, want)


Very beautiful, it seems after the Chinese began to appreciate the tones. From far away, in my speech everything is bad.

2018.11.05 bkrs Tinkered with tones and accidentally stumbled upon the Cantonese. I already heard somewhere that everything is complicated there, but for the first time after listening to them, I realized that we were very lucky with putonghua, everything is quite easy.


I was glad that I almost always distinguish tones (* if perfectly pronounced). And then I accidentally listened to it, in my head I rang “what. I” in all tones.

2018.11.06 vadimsw It is not entirely clear how many tones are official in Cantonese.
Not so long ago, two employees, natives of Guangzhou, joined our company. These are one of the first Guangzhou people with whom I can chat normally and ask everything.
He asked about the study of Cantonese at school, etc., and reached the tones with the question, "There are 6 tones, right?" They looked at me with a look of O_o and answered that they did not know (both).
In schools, Cantonese is not taught, at least in the GJ, I do not think that the grandparents from whom young people learn Cantonese teach it with the designation of tones. Most likely according to the principle "this word sounds like this, that’s so."
So is this an ignorance or an attempt to standardize a very vague language?

bkrs, the funny thing is that in practice everything is much simpler. When I just got to Cantonese, I was also wildly afraid of these tones, I did not hear the difference and all that. I’ll tell you for sure that they are at least no more complicated than putonghua (and there are no problems in Cantonese for Laovians to master at all) - it's just practice and constant swotting, and after a couple of weeks you start to hear everything.

in the flow of speech, it’s generally expanse - according to my feelings, I can say that tones can be divided into three groups conditionally: even, ascending and one low - 4. It is worth remembering that 1 is always high, even, 3 and 6 can often replace each other there is no other difference in the pronunciation of “1-3” and “1-6”, it is only emphasized that the first syllable is high, and the second is lower. The same situation is with rising tones 2 and 5.

Actually, these personal feelings were partially confirmed when studying literature, scientific articles and blogs in Cantonese - in Hong Kong, some talk about the gradual merging of 2 and 5 tones into a conditional 2nd tone (i.e., rising).
The 4th tone is as simple as two kopeks - it's a putonhuash 半 三 聲

add the ubiquitous 懶 音 - when n turns into l, the initial ng disappears completely (nguk1 屋 - uk1, ngan4baau1 銀包 - an4baau1), and the independent syllable ng 五 goes into m, gw into g (gwok-gok, gwong-gong and so on) - and you understand that Cantonese in phonetics is probably even simpler than putonghua

2018.11.05 bkrs Listened to Vietnamese, everything is cool there, but much simpler than Cantonese.

There was a Cantonese extracurricular course at the university, only the Vietnamese could speak Cantonese normally.

And yet, after 40 minutes of talking on it, my mouth is very sore.

2018.11.06 marenzhi I was more surprised by how she pronounces the simplest - ma in the first tone. This is not our Chinese 妈. They somehow squeeze a throat, or what they do, that sounds sound so strangely and disgusting. I am not a Nazi and all things. I lived a year with a Vietnamese in the same room. It is unbearable, one of the most vile languages ​​that I have heard.

Yes, but interesting, something deep, maybe even a different sound, there is still the usual a.

Probably, the presenter led to beauty. But the broken ˜ and interrogative ̉ tone carry the brain after the Chinese, because a completely different principle.

Special Cantonese Hieroglyphs

A set of hieroglyphs and words that are used in the non-literary version of the written Cantonese dialect based on the Yale Romanization system, their equivalents in standard Chinese with Cantonese and North Chinese transcription and translation into English.

Note: 啤 啤 仔 (bihbījái) is often transmitted in a letter in the form of BB 仔

Cultural role

In Russian, “Cantonese” can refer to both the Guangzhou dialect itself and the Yue language. A more precise name is “Cantonese” or “Guangzhou”.

Non-Guangdong Chinese people use names by area:

  • "The dialect of Guangzhou" (cant.trad. 廣州 話, ex. 广州 话, yutphin: gwong 2 jau 1 waa 2 cant.-rus .: kuon chow wah),
  • "The dialect of Guangzhou County" (cant. trade. 廣 府 話, exercise. 广 府 话, yutphin: gwong 2 fu 2 waa 2 cant.-rus .: kuon fu wa).

In Guangzhou, Guangdong and Hong Kong, Cantonese is most often called simple ("white") speech (cant. trade. 白話, ex. 白话, yutphin: baakwaa 2 cant.-rus .: pa: qty, not to be confused with the complete homonym Baihua - the modern literary norm of the Chinese language).

Guangdong also uses the name "Dialect of the provincial capital" (cant. trade. 省城 話, ex. 省城 话, yutphin: saang 2 seng 4 waa 2 cant.-rus .: sa: n-sen-wah).

In Hong Kong and Macau, Cantonese is called "Guangdong speech" (cant. trade. 廣東話, ex. 广东话, yutphin: gwong 2 dung 1 waa 2 cant.-rus .: Kuon Tun Wah).

"Kudos" lets you call Cantonese "Literary (standard) Cantonese" (cant. trade. 標準 粵語, ex. 标准 粤语, yutphin: biu 1 jeun 2 yut 6 yu 5 cant.-rus .: boo).

Cultural role [edit |

Yutphin (Jyutping (粵 拼))

The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) came out in 1993 with a new Cantonese romanization system called Jyutping. Yutphin can be used to record all the sounds of the modern Cantonese dialect, and the numbers in it are used to indicate tones. Also, this system can be used as a method of computer input of texts in the Cantonese dialect.

Guangdong Romanization System (广州 话 拼音 方案)

The Guangdong Cantonese romanization system was first published by the Guangdong Provincial Education Authority in 1960. It is mainly used in publications in the Cantonese dialect and about it, which are published in China. There are also similar transliteration systems for the Chaoshan dialect, the Hakka dialect and the Hainan language.

Notes:

Only in the Mayer-Wempe and Utiut systems do there exist differences between the sounds / ɕ / and / s /, which the majority of Cantonese speakers in Guangzhou do not distinguish between themselves, and which have ceased to distinguish between dictionaries from the beginning of the 1950s. Also, this difference can be found in the yutphin system, but only a small number of people use it.

In the Guangdong romanization system, j, q, x are used exclusively before i or u: in this case u is pronounced as ü.

What dialect of Chinese do you need to learn? What Chinese is understood by the majority of people living in mainland China? What Chinese are taught in our and English-language textbooks?

According to a Wikipedia article, there are a total of 10 major dialects of the Chinese language. I will not rewrite the article here, you yourself can read it on Wikipedia.

The official Chinese or 普通话 - pǔtōnghuà is the so-called standard, common or "simple" Chinese language. The same dialect of Chinese that, according to the Chinese government, should be known to every person with Chinese citizenship. Books are published in this dialect, television speakers speak it, and it is taught in all schools in China.

The Mandarin dialect is a Beijing dialect spoken by Beijing residents. In principle, we can say that pǔtōnghuà is a dialect of mandarin, but still there are several striking differences between mandarin and pǔtōnghuà.

Firstly this is the so-called “erization” - 儿 化, érhuà. Beijing residents add the ending 儿 "-er" wherever possible. For example, the adverb “a little”, in pǔtōnghuà sounds like “idyen”, on the mandarin it will sound like “idyar”. And it will be written in different ways:
idyon 一点 yídiǎn on pǔtōnghuà
with the addition of 儿 -er on mandarin - idyar 一点儿 yídiǎnr.
Therefore, if you are not going to live or study in Beijing, you do not need this erization.

Secondly. Mandarin tones are much more pronounced. Pekingese tint syllables very carefully. But this is rather a plus for language learners.

Thirdly. Mandarin has a lot of different slang expressions that are not used anywhere except in Beijing. And yes, almost all of these slangs have erization.

What is the result. If you are not going to go to Beijing - learn the standard pǔtōnghuà. Do not memorize words with erization. Knowing pǔtōnghuà, you can communicate with any more or less literate Chinese. Books that promise to teach you to speak the Mandarin dialect are suitable for learning, just remove the erization from there.

In my translated lessons and exercises, I always remove erizatsii, as I consider it superfluous. Adding it to speech is much simpler than retraining what has already been learned.

There is another dialect that is worth attention - this is the Cantonese dialect. This dialect is spoken in Hong Kong and in China, in the province of Guangdong (south of China). Also, this dialect is spoken by the majority of Chinese people living abroad of China - in the USA, Great Britain, Australia and Canada. The Cantonese language is completely different from the Mandarin dialect or pǔtōnghuà. It has 6 basic tones (not 4, as in the mandarin), a lot of slang and stable expressions, and also much less hissing sounds. So if you are interested in Chinese while living among English speakers, learn Cantonese.

I suggest you listen to pǔtōnghuà and Cantonese speech. The difference is obvious.

Putonghua pǔtōnghuà

Cantonese Cantonese sounds like this

And another point that can be confusing at the very beginning of learning Chinese is traditional and simplified hieroglyphs. I will talk about them in a separate article.

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