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How to play QWOP

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Just imagine if using the keyboard we could control not only the heroes of computer games, but also living people. James Hobson, host of the YouTube channel The Hacksmith, got the idea for something similar. To begin with, he decided to recreate in real life a primitive browser-based game QWOP, in which it is necessary to control the legs of the sprinter using the keys of the same name.

James developed an Arduino-based system that sends pulses to the electrodes when certain keyboard keys are pressed. As an experimental rabbit, he chose himself, connecting electrodes to various parts of his legs. As soon as his partner pressed one of the buttons, a powerful impulse came to one of the legs of the “tester”, forcing him to carry out the corresponding command.

The host of The Hacksmith periodically devotes his videos to various video games. He mainly creates replicas of game weapons and equipment. For example, last year, James made an exoskeleton from Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, and most recently, he showed how to create an Overwatch Genji sword with his own hands.

Gameplay and Reception

Players play as an athlete named Qwop, who participates in a 100-meter event at the Olympic Games. Using only Q, W, O and P keys, players must control the athlete's foot movement to make the character advance, trying to avoid falling. Q and W keys each engine is one of the runner's hips, while O and P keys work the runner's shins. Key Q leads the runner’s right thigh forward and left thigh back, and key W also touches the hips and does the opposite. O and keys P work in the same way Q and keys W, but with runner legs. The actual amount of joint movement is affected by resistance due to forces from gravity and inertia placed in it.

Although the goal QWOP simple, the game, since it was released, was notorious for being difficult to manage due to its controls with Q, W, O and P keys. Foddy says he gets a lot of hate mail in order to to do QWOP. Despite criticism for the difficulty of the game due to the controls, the game has helped Foddy's site reach 30 million hits, according to Wired Magazine, and, since the game was released, it has been played by millions of people, although numbers have recently declined.

Breakthrough and popular culture

In early December 2010, the game had a viral outbreak after video blogger Ray William Johnson viewed a YouTube video that annotated the game, which has since become the subject of its own Internet meme.

July 27, 2011 QWOP was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and was part of an event called “Gallery”, hosted by video game art, and a culture company Kill Screen.

Guinness World Records awarded Chintamani, Karnataka resident Rosan Ramachandra, for making the fastest 100m run on the game on April 10, 2013, making it 51 seconds away.

QWOP appeared at Season 9 Premiere of the American sitcom Office.

Alternate Versions

An app for the iPhone game was published in 2011. The application version follows the same gameplay as with the original version, but the controls are different. The player controls the QWOP legs and arms by moving their thumbs in diamonds on the screen. Koteku called the iPhone version "4,000 percent more impossible" than the original game and the "Olympic Thumb Problem." In January 2012, the Lance Lib Game Zone released QWOP For loading.

Multiplayer version with 2 players QWOPnamed 2QWOPwas also released in February 2012, after being featured at an event in Austin called the "Foddy Winter Olympics" Bennett Foddy games selection show. This version puts the game in a vertical splitscreen, automatically assigning the hips of one player and calves to Q, W, E, and keys R, while the other player uses U, me, O, and keys P.

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